Threading the City

Fiber Artists Miami Association (FAMA) wants to celebrate and mobilize the textile arts community with our first city-wide event Threading the City. Artists are a driving force in recharging communities and our economy. Recent data has proven that artists are drivers in placemaking. FAMA understands that the main ingredients to creative placemaking are creative initiators consisting of a team, building on our collective expertise, mobilizing support from organizations, community engagement, and creating partnerships. As such, Threading the City is an investment in an economic, cultural, and social platform that will help revitalize and showcase the extraordinary talent of local and international textile artists. The event serves as a platform to unite local and international artists, curators, institutions, and educators in dialogue to demystify the world of contemporary textile aRT.

Explore
Portals @ Artnezs, El Portal

Artnezs invites artists to explore outdoor sculpture, performance, installation, restorative harvesting and dyeing, and other tactile processes that relate to the theme of Portals: doorways, gates, large presences permitting passage, entry, acceptance, and inclusion. 

 

Opening a gate to redefine a neighborhood can recall the complex histories of those who once inhabited the lands and reflect the financial goals of those developing the area. Artists can acknowledge the cultural practices of those who came before them through traditional and non-traditional approaches to site-specificity. 

 

El Portal, meaning "the gate," in Spanish also references the huge wooden gates on Northeast Second Avenue that were deinstalled in the 1940s. The village was originally the capital of the Tequesta tribal area in the 16th century and is a designated bird sanctuary. There is a gate that remains today, separating NW 84th with 85th Street, demarcating the El Portal and Little River neighborhoods.

EL PORTAL

 

Opening a gate to redefine a neighborhood can recall the  complex histories of those who once inhabited the lands  and reflect the financial goals of those developing the  area. Artists can acknowledge the cultural practices of  those who came before them through traditional and non traditional approaches to site-specificity.

El Portal or the  gate references the forgotten wooden gates on Northeast  Second Avenue uninstalled in the 1940s. The village was  originally the capital of the Tequesta tribal area in the  16th century and is a designated bird sanctuary. A gate  remains today that separates El Portal and Little River  neighborhoods.  

October. 21, 2022, 5-7 PM. Opening. Artnezs, El Portal, Little River, Curator: Laura Marsh,  Contact: artnezsart@gmail.com , El Portal, Address: 66 NW 84 St, Miami, FL 33150, 305-780-1650, Hours of operation: Mon.-Thur. 10-4 PM, and by appointment. On view: Oct. 21-Dec. 9. instagram.com/artnezs.

Artnezs is a non-profit sculpture initiative dedicated to textiles and experiential learning.
Growing organically out of the studio and yard of artist, Laura Marsh, the project is dedicated to providing opportunities for artist-centered dialogues and exhibitions that embrace ritual, methodology, research, and communal activities.
Marsh launched Artnesz in 2022 after balancing art and administrative work for 15 years and discovering a need for community-driven research. As an advocate for fellow artists, Artnezs invites artists to explore outdoor sculpture, performance, installation, restorative harvesting and dyeing, and other tactile processes.
Artnezs stands for arts embodiment and the rediscovery of past and contemporary practices. Its location is between Miami’s Little River and El Portal neighborhoods, near a tribal gate within a bird sanctuary.
Instagram: @artnezs Web link: https://www.lauramarsh.net/artnezs

Generously Sponsored by

Funded by

Threading the City is funded by The Ellies, Miami’s visual arts awards, presented by Oolite Arts.

Funded by

“With the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners.”

Funded by

“Funding for this program was provided through a grant from Florida Humanities with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this (publication) (program) (exhibition) (website) do not necessarily represent those of Florida Humanities or the National Endowment for the Humanities.”